Treat Elevated Histamine, Naturally

Whole blood histamine levels are tested when determining cause of depression and other mood disorders.

Histamine is reduced or broken down by methyl compounds and so with high histamines the body may become depleted in the methyl groups. Because histamine depletes methyl compounds, it is easy to identify ones methylation status from their histamine levels. Elevated histamine depletes methyl compounds and the resulting undermethylation leads to depression and a host of other mood disorders.

Some common symptoms of undermethylation:
·    OCD obsessive compulsive tendencies
·    SAD Seasonal affective disorder
·    Competitive & perfectionist
·    SSRI medications usually effective
·    Calm exterior with inner tension
·    Strong willed
·    High libido
·    Seasonal allergies

Using the Walsh protocol to treat undermethylation I recommend supplements high in methyl compounds such as the amino acid methionine and SAMe (s-adenosyl methionine).

Diet is also an important factor. Foods that are high in methionine include lean meats, egg whites, poultry, halibut and other fish, soy beans, white beans and brazil nuts. SAMe and methionine help break down histamine by methylating it. Vegetarians and people with high histamine have a hard time getting sufficient methyl compounds in their diets and should be encouraged to take methionine supplements.

Histamine Intolerance:
Another approach to improving methylation status lies in reducing histamine levels in the first place. To this requires a study of one’s health condition and assessment of factors that raise histamine.

Histamine rich foods: Foods that are associated with high histamine levels include fermented foods such as sauerkraut, kombucha, pickles, wine, yogurt, mature cheeses and fermented soy products. It also includes cured, smoked and fermented meats such as salami and sausage, etc. Tomato paste, spinach and canned fish products also have high histamine levels. Citrus foods are histamine liberators which increase histamine release and so should also be avoided.

Histamine is chemically known as a “biogenic amine”. Fermented foods have high levels of these biogenic amines. These are foods that are exposed to microbial decomposition as part of the fermentation or in storage. Lactic acid bacteria are the most problematic biogenic amine producers in fermentation. These bacteria break down amino acids into amine-containing compounds. Biogenic amines are commonly found in wines, cider, dairy, meat, fish, beer, spinach, tomatoes and yeast. Biogenic amines in the form of histamine are the product of bacteria breaking down amino acids. Control biogenic amines to treat elevated histamine

Diamine Oxidase DAO
This is an important enzyme that naturally lowers histamine levels in the body. DAO can be provided as a supplement to lower histamine levels. Symptoms of low DAO includes:
·    Skin irritations – hives, itching, rashes, eczema, psoriasis, and acne
·    Headaches
·    Painful menstrual periods
·    Gastrointestinal symptoms
·    Intolerance to fermented foods and alcohol
·    Mucous in sinuses
·    Asthma

Supplements and OTC meds that increase DAO levels include:
·    Vitamin C
·    Vitamin B6
·    Pancreatic enzymes
·    Benadryl

Foods and meds that inhibit DAO
·    Alcohol
·    Curcumin (turmeric)
·    Cimetidine – an antihistamine

 

Histamine and Mast Cells
Histamine is released from “mast cells”. Mast cells are immune cells that line the mucous membranes of the sinuses, digestive tract, the skin, lungs, eyelids, and tissues surrounding blood vessels and nerves. Activation of mast cells plays a key role in asthma, rhinitis, eczema, itching, pain, autoimmunity and hives. Elevated mast cells are associated with female infertility and decreased sperm motility. Stabilize mast cells to treat elevated histamine.

Supplements that stabilize mast cells:
·    Quercitin
·    Curcumin (also decreases DAO)
·    Reishi mushrooms
·    Yohimbine
·    Adrenaline
·    Eleuthero
·    Rutin
·    Theanine
·    Astragalus

Cortisol and Corticotropic Releasing Hormone CRH
It is commonly believed that cortisol causes allergies. That’s only part of the picture. The fact is that cortisol itself lowers histamine levels. It is the hormone that stimulates the adrenal release of cortisol that causes histamine release from mast cells. Chronically elevated CRH is associated with stress, as the release of CRH causes cortisol release from the adrenal glands. Under chronic stress, cortisol levels are low as the adrenal glands become exhausted and cannot produce sufficient cortisol. Yet the CRH hormone is likely elevated in chronic stress because the  hypothalamus releases CRH via the HPA axis as the body is trying to induce more cortisol to address the stress perceived by the brain. Chronic stress is thereby a major cause of histamine release from mast cells due to the effect of corticotropic releasing hormone CRH. We can make assumptions about the level of CRH and cortisol by testing salivary cortisol levels. Because they have a circadian rhythm we test four salivary cortisol levels in a day to establish the overall performance and need for supplementation. Treating elevated cortisol or depressed cortisol levels requires a salivary cortisol test and understanding of the underlying condition.

Herbs and cortical extracts are used to down regulate or supplement the adrenal gland performance. This has the effect of lowering CRH and mast cell release of histamine.

Histamine and Lectins
Foods such as potatoes are high in lectins. Lectins can bind the lining of the intestinal wall and cause leaky gut syndrome. Undigested lectins then enter the blood system and lead to antibody formation and which releases histamine. Foods high in lectins include:

·    White potatoes and unmodified potato starch
·    Tomatoes
·    Soy
·    Gluten containing grains
·    Legumes

Histidine Decarboxylase HDC
The conversion of the amino acid histidine into histamine takes place with the help of HDC enzyme. It is possible to slow the conversion of histidine to histamine by inhibitors of HDC.

Inhibitors of HDC are:
·    Cortisol
·    Catechins – found in green tea, chocolate, kola nut, peaches, acai, apricots, apples, blackberries, raspberries, plums with skin and broad beans
·    SAMe
·    NAC N-acetyl cysteine
·    Homocysteine
·    Carnosine
·    Treat any underlying infection of H Pylori (very common with gastritis)

Histamine and Probiotics
Probiotics in the digestive tract are responsible for producing many compounds in the body. There are bacterial strains that increase histamine as well as intestinal microbes that reduce histamine.
Decreases histamine –  B infantis, B lognum and L plantarum
Increases histamine – L casei, L reuteri and L bulgaricus

Summary of supplements and recommendations to lower histamine while treating undermethylation:

·    Take methionine (500mg-1gm) and SAMe (200mg) supplements
·    DAO diamine oxidase enzymes 2-3 caps
·    Probiotics B infantis, B longum, L plantarum
·    Vitamin C 1000 mg
·    B6 (can also increase histamine carboxylase)
·    Avoid lectin in diet – potatoes and tomatoes
·    Avoid fermented foods
·    Increase proteins high in methionine
·    Use Cromolyn – OTC mast cell stabilizer
·    Bendryl
·    Bromelain and Quercitin
·    Chocamine 1-3 grams – mast cell stabilizer
·    Improve adrenals with herbal and glandular supplements
·    Curcumin (also decreases DAO)
·    NAC N-acetyl cysteine
·    Catechins (green tea etc)

Good Foods During Pregnancy

 We are all either undermethylators, overmethylators or normal methylators.

Many persons with depression are under or over methylators. Depressed women during pregnancy are frequently undermethylators. The good news is, there are many foods that provide to reverse the deficiency and lift depression. 

This published study in the Psych Congress Journal suggests that women who have maternal depression and are undermethylated, often give birth to children who experience depression due to their own ensuing condition of .

Whole blood histamine test is a lab that indicates methylation status. An excellent natural therapy may be methionine or SAMe supplements or foods that are high in methionine. If you have high blood histamines you may be undermethylated. Persons with seasonal allergies are frequently undermethylated. I recommend you get your levels tested before indulging in high methionine foods because your depression may in fact be associated with overmethylation, which requires an opposite approach, to lower methionine.

In consideration of the the study below, know your methylation status, particularly if you are depressed, and to combat during pregnancy, eat foods high in methionine and or take supplements. It won’t just make the mother feel better, but improves chance child won’t end up with depression.

Maternal Depression Linked to Methylation Changes in Offspring

by Will Boggs MD, Psych Congress

By Will Boggs MD

Maternal depression is associated with widespread changes in DNA methylation in their offspring that may persist into adulthood, researchers from Canada report.

“These data further demonstrate the potential long-term consequences of maternal depression for the health of future generations and the importance of mental health and social support of mothers and would be mothers for the physical health of newborn and children,” Dr. Moshe Szyf from McGill University in Montreal, Quebec, told Reuters Health by email. “What is remarkable is that the mental state of a mother causes changes in DNA methylation in the newborns in the immune system, not just the brain.”

Maternal mood disorders and stress during pregnancy can result in attention learning deficits during childhood and mood disorders during adulthood for their offspring. Evidence suggests these consequences may be mediated by modifications of DNA methylation levels.

Dr. Szyf’s team investigated possible associations between maternal depression and DNA methylation changes in T lymphocytes from neonatal cord blood and in hippocampal brain tissues from adults with or without histories of maternal depression.

Offspring of depressed mothers, however, showed significant differences in DNA methylation from those of nondepressed mothers in 145 T lymphocyte CG sites. Most (75.5%) were hypomethylated in the maternal depression group compared with the control group.

“One of the main surprises was that we found a larger effect of maternal depression on the babies’ DNA methylation than the maternal DNA methylation,” Dr. Szyf said. “The second surprise was that it seems that the effect is a consequence of lifelong depression rather than depression only around the pregnancy period.”

“For healthy babies to develop into healthy adults it is important to have healthy mothers,” Dr. Szyf said. “And this involves not only physical and metabolic health but also mental and social wellbeing. This hopefully will be an important pillar in prenatal care as well as public policy relating to preconception health.”

“The consequences of maternal depression might suggest using epigenetic interventions for prevention and reversal of the impacts of maternal depression on the offspring,” Dr. Szyf added. “One clinical potential of the data is the possibility of developing biomarkers of maternal depression that might serve as predictors of lifelong health risks and guide early interventions.”

Dr. Joanne Ryan from University of Melbourne’s Murdoch Childrens Research Institute, Australia, who recently reviewed and depressive disorders, told Reuters Health by email, “An important next step in this research is to determine whether these methylation differences and associated with health outcomes in the infants/children. Maternal depression during pregnancy has been associated with long-term negative outcomes in the child — the data from this study should be used to determine whether such effects can be mediated by differential DNA methylation.”

To find out more about good foods during pregnancy to help with low methionine, we checked with our favorite food resource.

http://nutritiondata.self.com/